Best 2023 Raspberry Pi Alternatives

The Raspberry Pi continues to suffer from supply chain issues. They have promised there are a lot of their very old models that should be coming up for purchase within the next 6 months. I’ve been hearing that for years though to be honest with you.

Fortunately you don’t need to wait. There are more and better alternatives to the Raspberry Pi in 2023 than there have ever been before. In this article I’ll cover the best Raspberry Pi alternatives in 2023.

Let’s get started!

Best High Performance Alternative

Radxa Rock 5B Review
Radxa Rock 5B
Radxa Rock 5B
Radxa Rock 5B

The Radxa Rock 5B has 8 CPU cores, a PCIe 3.0 interface and a powerful GPU. It’s one of the top performing single board computers available on Pi Benchmarks.

Links: AliExpress*, Amazon.com*

Let’s start with the obvious king of performance on single board computers so far in 2023: the Radxa Rock 5B. This board uses the RockChip RK3588 SoC which has a whopping 8 CPU cores. The board absolutely destroys the Raspberry Pi 4 and Compute Module 4 on both CPU and GPU performance.

Why is this board so great? Not only does it have a M.2 NVMe slot (something we are seeing more and more on alternative boards but not on the Raspberry Pi yet) but it actually supports PCIe 3.0! That means it’s actually worth using a high performance PCIe Gen3/Gen4 drive in this board. Most other boards out there will only support PCIe 2.0 (if they have it at all).

This board is suitable for beginners. It’s suitable for people from the Pi ecosystem who may be trying other boards for the first time. This board is a breath of fresh air because so many of the boards I test work great but are incredibly difficult to get started with. That’s not the case with the Rock 5B and some of the other RK3588/RK3588S models coming out.

The biggest drawback for many people will be the price. If the price seems too high starting around $140 I would highly recommend checking out the Orange Pi 5. The Orange Pi 5 uses the RK3588S which lacks the PCIe 3.0 interface but is much less expensive. We will cover that board later in the article.

This board leaves the Raspberry Pi 4 so far behind in the dust that it’s really questionable if they’ll ever catch up. I personally don’t think so. I’d imagine that Radxa and others shipping the newer RockChip tech are the new kings of the SBC performance world. I have a full review of the Radxa Rock 5B here.

Best Mid-Range Alternative

Orange Pi 5 with Heat Sinks
Orange Pi 5 with Heat Sinks
Orange Pi 5 - Top View
Orange Pi 5

The Orange Pi 5 the latest release from Orange Pi and is the most powerful model yet. It has a 6 core CPU and options from 4GB of RAM all the way up to 32GB of RAM!

Links: Amazon.com*, AliExpress*, Amazon.ca*, Amazon.co.uk*, Amazon.de*, Amazon.es*, Amazon.fr*, Amazon.it*, Amazon.nl*, Amazon.pl*

We’ve covered the highest performing single board computer with the Rock 5B but now let’s look at a version that costs less than $100: the Orange Pi 5!

The Orange Pi 5 has *almost* the exact same CPU as the Rock 5B with one critical difference. The Orange Pi 5 uses the RK3588S. Notice that it has the “S” at the end. This is a variant of the RK3588 that does *not* contain PCIe 3.0. It only contains PCIE 2.0.

The practical effects of this is that it generally doesn’t make sense to use an extremely powerful PCIe 3.0 NVMe drive with the Orange Pi 5. You can use either a regular M.2 SATA or just a budget/cheap NVMe drive. Since it can’t run at PCIe 3.0 speeds there is no point in putting an extremely powerful drive in this.

Neither the Orange Pi 5 or the Rock 5B come with integrated WiFi. They both have WiFi adapters available. I wanted to mention this difference because Raspberry Pi users will be used to it always being integrated with the board. Although these two boards are much more powerful one drawback is you do need to get the WiFi adapter for them (or use a USB-based WiFi adapter).

We’ve seen a ton of people successfully meet their project needs with the Orange Pi 5 in my review here. This ranges from everything from upgrading their Home Assistant instance from a slow 4-core Raspberry Pi 4 to the smoking fast Orange Pi 5 which dramatically reduced their build time when updating devices in Home Assistant.

The Orange Pi 5 can also achieve 2-3x higher I/O performance (great for servers) than the Raspberry Pi 4 due to having access to NVMe and not having to use a USB to SATA/NVMe adapter. We’ve also seen people have success using emulation if you use Armbian and enable the 3D driver support for the Orange Pi 5.

Best Budget Alternatives

Libre Computers "Le Potato"
Libre Computers “Le Potato”
Libre Computers "Le Potato"
Libre Computers “Le Potato”

The “Le Potato” from Libre Computers is meant to be a fully open sourced alternative to the Raspberry Pi. It can run a huge number of flavors and has up to date images available for them. Contains a Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 CPU as well as a Mali-450 GPU as well as 2GB of RAM. Make sure you click the $5 off coupon if you are using Amazon!

Links: Amazon.com*, Amazon.ca*, Amazon.com.au*, Amazon.co.jp*, Amazon.co.uk*, Amazon.de*, Amazon.es*, Amazon.fr*, Amazon.it*, Amazon.sg*

Now let’s get to the budget options. These budget options are so cheap they will rival the Raspberry Pi at retail price (which nobody can buy it at and hasn’t been able to for years). They’re also the most compatible of all of the options I’ve covered.

The Libre Computers boards can literally run Raspberry Pi OS. Not only that, it can actually dual boot between Libre Boards and the Raspberry Pi. You can run a script while inside Raspberry Pi OS that will enable booting with Libre Computers boards. You can actually take that SD card out of the Raspberry Pi, use it with the Libre board and then put it back in the Raspberry Pi and it will work perfectly!

I’ve covered this in this guide here called enabling Raspberry Pi OS to run on Libre Computers Boards here.

But wait, there’s more! The Libre Computers boards can also use the majority of Raspberry Pi hats. Now this does require using a tool to help enable the overlays but this is something that is usually impossible on alternative boards. Libre Computers has a translation layer tool that will let you use Raspberry Pi overlays with the Libre Computers boards. You can see the tool here on GitHub for more information about using Raspberry Pi overlays.

The “Le Potato” only costs $35 on Amazon at time of writing. You can read my full review of the “Le Potato” here. It’s meant to be an alternative to the Raspberry Pi 3.

It also has a big brother called the “Renegade” that is more equivalent to a Raspberry Pi 4:

Libre Computers "Renegade" - Front View
Libre Computers “Renegade” – Front View
Libre Computers "Renegade"
Libre Computers “Renegade” ROC-RK3328-CC Firefly

The ROC-RK3328-CC Firefly “Renegade” from Libre Computers is a very powerful RockChip based single board computer. The “Renegade” features 2G of DDR4 RAM, USB 3.0, a quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU, a Mali-450 GPU and 1 USB 3.0 port!

Links: Amazon.com*, Amazon.ca*, Amazon.com.au*, Amazon.co.jp*, Amazon.co.uk*, Amazon.de*, Amazon.es*, Amazon.fr*, Amazon.it*, Amazon.sg*

The Renegade is more powerful and has USB 3.0. It comes in a nice black color in contrast to the white color of the “Le Potato”.

With the on-board USB 3.0 port you can achieve very high I/O performance scores rivaling anything a Pi 4 can do. The quad-core CPU is no slouch either and the 2GB of RAM included doesn’t leave you starving for resources. It’s very comparable to a entry-level 2GB Pi 4 but you can buy 2-3 of these boards for the prices that the Pi is going for right now. Benchmarking showed excellent performance gains using a SSD with this board (and pretty impressive SD card performance as well).

It’s only slightly more than the “Le Potato” going for $40 on Amazon at time of writing.

You can view my full review on the Libre Computers “Renegade” here.

Best Pi Zero / Pi Zero 2 Alternative

Radxa Zero - Top
Radxa Zero
Radxa Zero - Top
Radxa Zero

The Radxa Zero comes in the form factor of the Raspberry Pi Zero but is upgraded to USB-C and a quad-core CPU. Available with RAM options of 1/2/4GB and eMMC options of 8/16/32/64/128GB.

Links: AliExpress*, Amazon.co.uk*, Amazon.de*, Amazon.es*, Amazon.fr*, Amazon.it*, Amazon.nl*, Amazon.pl*, Amazon.se*

This category is easy. It’s the Radxa Zero. It’s everything that the Raspberry Pi Zero 2W should have been including USB-C, much higher memory options than anything offered on the Pi Zero / Zero 2W and much more.

If you need a very small form factor or the form factor of a Raspberry Pi Zero this will be a fantastic alternative for people who can get away with not having to use Raspberry Pi OS. If you’re able to use Armbian / Debian / Ubuntu instead then it’s very likely you can use this alternative to the Raspberry Pi Zero 2W.

Cooling is definitely recommended. The copper heat sinks I recommend are great* but make sure you have something. The quad-core CPU is quite powerful and if you run it bare you’ll run into throttling and other issues a lot more frequently. It will perform better / smoother with a heat sink on it for sure.

This board is suitable for beginners. You don’t need to do any firmware flashing or anything fancy to get this one working. A USB to TTY serial console is not required with this board. You can plug it into a monitor and configure it that way. It also includes WiFi/Bluetooth capabilities which avoids having to try to buy an extra adapter for it.

You can see my full review of the Radxa Zero here.

Conclusion

It has been really hard to recommend Raspberry Pi alternatives in the past. They were just so far behind what Raspberry Pi was doing and the level of support they offered. I think the majority of people will be very, very happy to know that has changed dramatically.

Radxa / Orange Pi / Libre Computers have all been at this working hard for years. The support on their boards is finally ready for mainstream users. You can use one of these boards for projects you likely want to do. There are many choices of images available for each of them with the number growing every day.

I’ve reviewed a ton of other boards on the site as well that are worth considering. Don’t be too offended if your board/company didn’t make the 2023 best boards list. These are just the most compelling choices I have seen after reviewing dozens of these at this point. These are the ones that are worth your time / consideration that I’ve reviewed so far. If you know of other hidden gems out there I haven’t reviewed let me know in the comments as I’d love to check them out!

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Balázs
Balázs
5 months ago

I wouldn’t say that radxa zero needs that much of a cooler. It is much better than the pi zero 2 even without cooling it is pretty chill (for me it was about 50 celsius with heavy load)

will
will
8 months ago

$200+ for a pi 4 knock off and $70 for the same of a pi zero 2…that’s more than and equal to the pis. sheesh. the age of pi like gadgets is gone. microcontrollers or mini pcs and skip the middling middle. that said, it wasn’t fun watching the triumph of the corp over the foundation. can’t be shocked when they behave like nvidia on its last dying grift now. the rosey colored foundation doing good has turned to pale green. .

Willian
Willian
8 months ago

I want to say that how incredible this blog is. It was kind of hard to find it because “raspberry pi alternatives” on google usually just sends to a bunch of SEO spams that didn’t actually try a lot of options. Thank you!

Also, do you make money from the Aliexpress links? I think I just made a decision on a SBC to buy (radxa zero as a replacement to pi zero) and wanted to support you.

eli b.
eli b.
11 months ago

Hey! Thanks for all the good info here. One thing that may become more relevant over time is the ARM instruction subsets supported by the CPU on this chip. For example, mongodb began requiring support for Armv8.2-A in mongodb 5.x and 6.x mid-last year, effectively cutting off the RPi4 and many of the cheap alternatives from receiving updates. A couple of weeks ago, they did the same for the 4.4.x series without warning. Any SoC using the Cortex A53 or older Cortex A7x cores won’t cut it–you’ll need something with a Cortex-A55 or Cortex-A75 at minimum. From what I can tell, the only chips in SBCs right now that fit the bill are the RK3568 and RK3588 variants, and the cheapest thing you can find one of those in right now is an ODROID-M1, which will run around $100 once you include shipping. I do hope that the price of these SoCs comes down, or cut down versions that still have the newer instruction sets appear to replace the current chips, because otherwise, long-term, we may be seeing more of this. (I don’t know the technical reason that the mongodb devs impose this requirement in their build process, and haven’t come across other projects with this issue, fwiw. So this might be something niche enough not to matter, at least for now. But I’m wary.)

Oh, while we’re discussing price–the Orange Pi 5 is now more or less the same price as the Radxa, and nowhere near the $100 it was in the past. I’m not sure if this is a temporary or permanent change, but either way, you may want to update this post accordingly.

eli b.
eli b.
11 months ago

While I’m also very intrigued by RISC-V, and am very wary of any one privately-held company holding so much power in a specific part of the market in the way ARM does, I don’t think this is really a matter of open vs non-open–it’s just looks like technical progress, akin to some modern x86 programs expecting at minimum SSE3 be supported on the processor. Here’s the jira ticket at mongodb which is why I qualified my post so much. In other words, I don’t know how many other programs really rely on this kind of newer functionality. For me personally, the relevance of this is that TP-Link Omada Controller software, which has otherwise been pretty solid for me, uses mongodb on their backend, and I noticed that it stopped working soon after the 4.4.19 update was pushed. There is no separate ARM64-v8.2+ target repository on e.g. Ubuntu Server 22.04 (what I’ve been using on my Le Potato), so everybody running that on even a somewhat newer device like an RPi4–a fair amount of people, I bet, since the standalone hardware Omada Controllers run at about $100 to start and are much less capable than any SBC–let alone other competitive low-end boards, will end up in this situation. I ended up having to revert back to 4.4.18 and pin all related packages (as per this post here) and running a quick mongodb --repair in order get things back up and running. Anyway, I just wanted to point this out since it may threaten the long-term viability of some of the cheaper boards, unfortunately, if pinning packages is not an option.

As for the pricing situation, I’m not in Europe–somehow when I posted this yesterday what I was looking at was the 16GB version, which is around $140ish with shipping.

I didn’t notice this when I posted last night, mea culpa. I’m not sure if that was the top hit when I clicked on the affiliate link, if I somehow got redirected to it, or if that’s where I had landed after a quick Google. I found a listing that has 4, 8, and 16gb options, with and without power supplies, here.

The seller is listed as Orange Pi, which if you click through to the seller in page here.
claims to be
“‘Shenzhen Xiao Tudou Technology Co., Ltd.’, ‘the source manufacturer of Orange Pi'”

Checking orangepi.org, while they do not list any Amazon.com affiliate links right now, they list three different aliexpress affiliates, the first of which, here is indeed the ‘Shenzhen XiaoTuDou Technology Store’.

So it seems legitimate enough, though I’m not sure why they have three different official distributors. The second distributor, ‘Shenzhen Xunlong Software CO’,

has been around for longer and has slightly higher ratings on both Amazon and especially on AliExpress. In any case, ordering via FBA/Prime should mitigate any risk here considerably, and they do have the 8GB models available via FBA right now, fwiw. I don’t need another SBC yet but it is tempting at $108+tax. (Actually, maybe this should be the basis for a like-for-like comparison price-wise with the Radxa? Since it seems like the Radxa doesn’t come in a 4GB base model, but rather an 8GB one, but I might have missed it.)

Aside, while I’ve seen a 32gb version in news reports, and it is mentioned briefly on orangepi.org, I’ve never actually come across a listing for it or seen it for sale. Nor have I ever seen the 5B models that come with WiFi/BT built-in. Have you come across either of these for sale anywhere?

(also–I see that your comments have embedded links, how exactly does that work? Can we use markdown? Straight-up html? There are no instructions, and I hate how messy these posts look.)

eli b.
eli b.
11 months ago

Ah, I see, that makes sense about how the FBA works, and glad to know that both listings are legit–thanks for all this background info, and you take care as well!

Razor Burn
Razor Burn
11 months ago

Wow excellent contribution from @eli b especially the news about ARM support for older generation chips as its the first I’ve seen mentioned and maybe why we haven’t seen any news from Raspberry Pi on what the future holds as relying on older chips with A72 or A53 cores doesn’t cut it in 2023 and why we see Radxa and others pushing the RK35XX SOCs in their newer boards…?

Thanks for the clarification regarding Orange Pi and the reason for multiple sellers and Amazon as I’ll admit its a maze trying to search for boards as on Aliexpress you see the Radxa Rock 5B, Orange Pi 5 and others sold for insane prices so I always aim to refer to the company websites or reputable sites such as yours as that way I know I’m purchasing from a legit seller and not some scammer and as for Radxa you’re correct as they seem to use allnetchina for Asia/Oceania; ameriDROID for North America/Europe and OkDO for UK/parts of Europe and taxes and shipping add to already expensive costs for their boards and what’s really frustrating is you order a SBC but the seller doesn’t have the accessories so you’re stuck waiting or placing multiple orders that inflate already expensive costs. A real shame as they manufacture excellent hardware but far from flawless as you demonstrated in some recent reviews eg. Radxa CM3. Its not only Radxa that do this as some places like FriendlyELEC or Pine64 have limited options and when they sellout you have to wait for restocking.

I see on the Orange Pi 5B website they list 2 stores but not available yet with talk that a full RK3588 SBC is in the plans and work being done in github updating the OPi 5/5B and as for pricing I see the official stores on Aliexpress offering similar pricing to the presale and some offering accessories that seem affordable so unless people are holding out for the OPi 5B which I don’t see a need for myself, now’s a good time to buy as its still the cheapest RK3588S SBC available with excellent community support and I see FriendlyELEC released the R6C which is an upgrade to the R6S with added GPIO headers, one less 2.5GB port so they could include an M.2 slot but since its RK3588S its still limited in I/O with only 2 usbs ports and software support is lacking but they offer an Android 12 TV version with GApps and usb wireless dongle drivers preinstalled but again shipping and lack of certification are my biggest concerns but its good to see manufactures adopting faster hardware and now we just need ODROID to come along with a RK3588 version as Pine64 are happy to wait for mainline kernel support as 3D graphics is still largely unsupported.

As for 32GB RAM on the RK3588, its possible but way too costly with Genentech DB3588V2 supposedly offering it on their SBC and the only real confirmation being a recently announced PlanetPC XR2 Mini PC offering 32GB LPDDR5 RAM but its super expensive and unless we see massive demand its just no feasible or worthwhile as the RK3588 is still not optimised for power hungry applications due to the limited GPU support and for most general use or gaming 8-16GB RAM is more than enough and despite advertising for AI or 8K many of the devices fail to deliver as Rockchip do a bad job dropping these chips and expecting the community to customise the software!

I agree that RISC-V is the way of the future yet its still not ready for SBC applications and works wonderfully in microcontrollers due to the low power yet they’re a pain to image if your a newbie but then again so are most of the ARM based boards and forget about trying Android as half the time it causes issues as is regularly experienced with the Orange Pi 5 and the main reason why I’ve stuck to using Armbian for now and even that was a bit difficult writing bootloader from SPI flash to nVME and no operation is perfect. Khadas do have an inbedded system for flashing on their newer boards called OOWOO but even then you can only do it from the device so far from perfect, Hardkernel uses a petitboot system which is one of the better methods so I’d like to see an industry wide solution as it would save on the need for dodgy tools and the like and add to the user experience but I’m well aware this won’t happen anytime soon… Great discussion!

eli b.
eli b.
11 months ago

(looking again, it does seems like the base Radxa board does come with 4gb, so nvm the bit on price at the end. Right now I’m seeing the 4GB boards go for $175 on AliExpress, when clicking on the affiliate link and sorting by ascending price. In comparison with the Orange Pi 5, the value proposition really isn’t there…)

eli b.
eli b.
11 months ago

Mmm, cutting out the middlemen and trying to get directly into as many marketplaces as possible is a boon, and otherwise with these kinds of things I do try to stick to official channels. I did manage to get a Pi 4 from Adafruit at list price in late 2021, and am very glad I jumped on that without thinking–the situation since has been basically impossible, and is what turned me onto these alternative Amlogic and Rockchip boards in the first place. Actually, while I was on the fence on this, I’m pretty sure that it was your post on the Le Potato that put me over the edge. The top reviews on Amazon on many of them are several years old and tell of a dire software situation, which is much less true today than it was in, say, 2018. While I’ve seen some more contemporary complaints related to GPIO (and I’m not sure if they used the wiring tool or not), my Le Potato has been pretty solid, and is actually the *only* Linux machine I use right now that’s already on kernel 6.0, supported directly by the manufacturer! I restart it once every couple of weeks because the swap gets used up rather quickly by mongodb, but otherwise, it’s been pretty much fine serving its purpose as a basic network services device (separate from the main gateway/router). So again, much appreciated!

Jim
Jim
1 year ago

Hello

I liked that “they promiced to get available more 4 year old raspberry pi’s 4” market failure

Or they dont care at all or they dont know what they doing

You forgot the odroid N2L and the stil a beast after all this years XU4

I played with Rpi-zero2 a little, it lacks compatibility a lot compared to the Rpi3,things that work in Rpi3 they fail on Z2 even with bullseye OS, what a shame a disaster i begin to think they dont know what they doing

Jim
Jim
1 year ago

Shame for the Z2 it lacks of compatibility and quality, overpriced (now) and slappy work
I said it will replace my pi3 but i dont see it,
The only think was that the card reader works better than pi3 i think,, instead of making pi’s5 they making pi’s4 wrong strategy but people will still buy it like crazy even if is old

They are way back from the competition
I read that pi5 will be again quad core,so even if they released a pi5 it will be slower than the competition again.

Goodnight

Jim
Jim
1 year ago

Morning,i started with pi1 model b, although i was not using it a lot cause it was slow for me,i was using more my mk802 that was arm7 with 1gb ram and could take ubuntu,then pi2 came etc.
I think they dont care about competition they know that they will sell like crazy even if they have the slowest sbc,people just buys coz its a raspberry pi.

The 8 cores exist from 2015 with xu4,were pi2/pi3 was the top model back then,they said back then odroid c2 was 10 times faster than pi2/pi3,even odroid c4 that was released the same year at pi4 can play 8k at 25fps were pi4 plays 4k only,thats not competition at all.

They bet only in people they know they buy it whatever it is

Razor Burn
Razor Burn
1 year ago

I’ll admit I was on the fence with the Odroid N2+ as every time I went to place an order it was sold out and then I saw they came out with the compact N2L and I was ready to pounce but was ultimately put off with the fact that it uses the older AMLogic S922X chip which is still a beast for most emulation and media streaming yet the limitation of 2-4 GB RAM made me look elsewhere and now that we’re seeing ‘affordable’ RK3588S devices that allow up to 16GB RAM it makes more sense to go for the added performance. Not to discredit Hardkernel as they provide heaps of accessories and the N2+ is very popular with a large following due to reliability and ease of use.

Regrettably I was late to reading your review of the RPi Zero 2W as its a fair assessment of what was marketed as a new product from the RPi Foundation yet the build quality leaves a lot to the imagination and knowing about viable alternatives now means I’d be hard pressed in rushing to add any more even when supplies return and especially since they recently announced a price increase which adds to the disappointment and leaves a bitter taste!

Its hard to argue with your selection as there’s a board to fit most peoples budgets and I’d be curious to see an update in the next few months as you could argue for the StarFive VisionFive 2 to be included once they workout the issues and get proper support pluswe’re sure to see more RK3588/S boards released on the back of the success of the Rock 5B and Orange Pi 5 that should push pricing down…?

renaud
renaud
1 year ago

When the Raspberry pi zero 2w hit the market I immediately ordered for around 100€, each one was at 16.5€ and I still use some of them in daily usage (audio player). I deactivated some cores and defined an ultra low speed for the last core. I am happy with the card like that, consumption is ultra low and I can still listen to the music and let the player on. Not a bad card for sure at this price.

Razor Burn
Razor Burn
1 year ago

Hard to argue James as the biggest argument I still hear from Raspberry Pi enthusiasts is how you can’t compare something new as its such and such times more than a Zero or Pi A/B, forgetting the fact that nobody is actually selling any Pi’s at near pre-pandemic pricing besides the popular Pico’s and only then due to the low cost inhouse RP2040 chip and even then the clone boards come just as cheap or ESP32 make for a more suitable option.

The days of a cheap RPi are forever gone and the quicker users realise this the better as judging by the direction set during the last few years I see less emphasis on the charitable side and more on catering for larger clients who can afford to buy in bulk for what really is 2020 technology leaving the average consumer with the dilemma of ‘pre ordering’, over paying or looking elsewhere but that’s hard as the same fanbase cloud peoples judgement with ill informed statements that such and such board is crap or unsupported which is almost always the case blatantly wrong as was recently observed with the Radxa Rock 5B or Orange Pi 5.

Its easy to see why Raspberry Pi (Trading) Ltd is stuck in there ways as its more profitable catering for an existing ‘industrial’ client base that buys in hundreds if not thousands of units which is why we never see the magical releases and they’re own numbers state 100,000s produced weekly yet licenced retailers still have no units for sale and even those that do don’t ship anywhere near MSRP which technically goes against the mission statement but we’re no longer in 2011 so time to move on and ignore the naysayers as this blog alone has reviewed many viable alternatives that beat the RPi for performance, affordability and have adequate support ensuring average users can quickly adapt the board of their choice instead of holding out hope of seeing a mythical Pi 5 that will remind everyone of past glories but nothing they’ve recently done fills me with any confidence that its coming soon or will release with pricing that made the brand so popular…?!

I write this as somebody who commenced last year searching for a Raspberry Pi device and was fortunate enough to land a 4B 8GB for near MSRP by pure chance and overpaid for 2 Zero 2W’s and they’re decent kit but 12 months later I’ve seen the light thanks in large part to blogs such as this one where I learned about other brands and the risks choosing an alternatives as supply constraints have seen prices go up across the industry making it difficult as what used to cost tens of dollars now costs hundreds so its not only limited to RPi but they seem to get a pass whilst other brands have managed to keep their products available and reasonably priced so it really bothers me seeing quotes of MSRP for devices that clearly don’t sell for that even through licensed stockists!

I respect your position James as it comes from somebody who is well experienced having owned and reviewed the Raspberry Pi devices and compared them to other SBC’s at great cost to yourself yet some people can’t see beyond the brand and stay loyal despite all indications showing that the RPi strategy of making boards easily accessible to the average maker is no longer viable and unless your a ‘mum & pop / industrial’ client you’re no longer the target audience which is a real shame as the devices are great tools for educating new users to Linux but can’t be seen as the standard for SBCs in 2023.

The alternatives come with better performance and a community growing by the day as witnessed with the RK3558 boards where we’re now seeing support across the devices and newer distros that where only possible on a RPi device, not to mention emulation that makes the appeal of using a Pi 4B for retro gaming a distant memory as once you tackle the initial setup process you’re greeted to better performance at reasonable prices and availability as opposed to false promises made by RPi that we could expect to see units ready for sale in 2023 yet there’s no signs and we already know they’re increasing pricing which will only get added to already ludicrous costs for 2020 technology that has very little relevance to todays high demands and user expectations… I too hope I’m wrong as I want to see improvements being made but all I’ve seen so far indicates stagnation and I’m not willing to wait for 2024/2025 to see improvements so we’ll see what the remain months bring for the industry.

Razor Burn
Razor Burn
1 year ago

Well said and my sentiments indeed!

Jim
Jim
11 months ago

If they release sudden a zero3 with the cpu of pi4 and at least 1gb ram in a logical price like 25-30 then they dont need a pi5 for some time but still they dont do anything than promising new stock of old tech,at least a zero2plus with 1gb ram something guys scalping season on!!!

Jim
Jim
11 months ago

Thats nothing were they will ship them first 10 to greece 10 to Holland 10 to etc

It reminds me the zero1 that first was only available in England in a magazine as a gift.and people/scalpers were buying dozens and selling them in ebay in crazy prizes

Raspberry should move to the zero pcb size factor only,they just cannot make it in normal size factor..

Jim
Jim
11 months ago

Hello there

James i dont remember if i asked before, is it possible to take over this project:

https://github.com/maxnet/berryboot

The creator stopped support it over 1.5 year ago, thousands and more people are using it,i dont think maxnet the creator will have problem give it to you,you are experienced with github stuff and im sure you can evolve it/improve it,if you do take it somehow i will be the first to donate.

Thanks